Memento mori: Photography in the face of the inevitable | The Japan Times

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With the Bon holidays, a period during which Buddhists believe dead ancestors return to commune with the living, just behind us, an exhibition at the Tokyo Photographic Art (TOP) Museum in Meguro Ward explores the photograph as a reminder of the inevitability of death. Drawing from its extensive archive, the museum brings considerable resources to bear in examining the often-discussed relationship between mortality and the photographic image.

In the 1977 essay “In Plato’s Cave,” Susan Sontag suggests that “all photographs are memento mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s (or thing’s) mortality, vulnerability, mutability. Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it.” Roland Barthes, while circling around the significance of a treasured picture of his late mother in his 1980 book “Camera Lucida,” described a central function of photography as showing “that-has-been.”

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This page was created programmatically, to read the article in its original location you can go to the link bellow:
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