Supergiant planet Jupiter can’t be missed as it crosses the night sky

This page was created programmatically, to read the article in its original location you can go to the link bellow:
https://www.columbian.com/news/2022/sep/20/supergiant-planet-jupiter-cant-be-missed-as-it-crosses-the-night-sky/
and if you want to remove this article from our site please contact us


Some will likely assume it’s a far-off airplane. Others may contact the National UFO Reporting Center, located in Eastern Washington, with news of a mysterious phenomenon in the sky. In October 2010, according to The Peninsula Daily News, the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office fielded numerous reports of a UFO that turned out to be Jupiter shimmering brilliantly.

On that occasion, Jupiter was passing closer to Earth than it had since 1963 (368 million miles). But this month, Jupiter is nudging even closer to Earth. On Sept. 26, the two planets will make their closest approach since 1952, shrinking the distance between us to an intimate 367 million miles.

Earth in between

Sept. 26 is the date of what’s called Jupiter opposition. Opposition simply means that the sun and one of the outer planets appear directly opposite one another in the sky — with our eager eyes smack in between. It’s as if Earth sits at the center of a cosmically long, straight line, with the sun at one end and Jupiter at the other. When the sun sets, Jupiter rises (at 7:25 p.m. Monday). When Jupiter sets, the sun rises.

Opposition is only for planets farther away from the sun than we are. Inner planets Mercury and Venus can never be at opposition because they are closer to the sun than Earth. Wherever the sun appears, Mercury and Venus always appear nearby, never on the other side of the sky.

Planets in opposition are also in “full phase,” from our vantage point, facing the sun right over our shoulder and reflecting sunlight directly back at us with maximum fullness and brightness. That will allow big, brilliant Jupiter to really pop in our night sky, especially around midnight, when the bright planet climbs to its highest point in the contrasting darkness.


This page was created programmatically, to read the article in its original location you can go to the link bellow:
https://www.columbian.com/news/2022/sep/20/supergiant-planet-jupiter-cant-be-missed-as-it-crosses-the-night-sky/
and if you want to remove this article from our site please contact us

Scott Hewitt

Leave a Reply

You have to agree to the comment policy.

16 + 19 =